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Create Your Own Calm

Create Your Own Calm

Mindfulness isn’t a “quick fix” to solving all your problems. Instead, mindfulness is a tool kit that you can pull resources from when you’re faced with moments of stress or anxiety. You can also pull from your “mindfulness tools” to help you create more moments of calm. Try this easy writing trick before bed to help you dial into the positive and significant moments in your daily life. Eventually, you can look back on your week or month and see so many wonderful moments you can be grateful for.

Writing down just (1) positive moment from your day can have a profoundly positive effect on you.

Use one of these prompts to get you started:

Color for Calm: 3 Free Resources to Try Now!

Color for Calm: 3 Free Resources to Try Now!

Coloring can activate calm and settle your nervous system. That’s why we include it as a resource in our MBAwareness Educational Program. Teachers and students alike benefit from a few minutes of coloring for calm.

According to this article by Positive Psychology, “mindfulness coloring allows us to switch off extraneous thoughts and focus on the moment.” While you can find a “mindful coloring” book at nearly any retailer, here are a couple of our favorite online resources for kids and adults

Customize Your Kicks

Who doesn’t want the chance to customize their own Converse, Vans, Air Force Ones, and other easily recognizable sneaker silhouettes? These fun coloring pages are from Kitchen Table Classroom Just sign-up to get access to her FREE Resource Library and you can download this 5-page coloring template along with a host of other cool art and home education resources! 

 

Words to Color (and Live) By

Kristina from Planes and Balloons has created these mantra coloring sheets that are equal parts calm and empowering. You can download her FREE trio of coloring sheets with words like “Be Still” and “Just Breathe” embellished with beautiful floral patterns.

 

Color What You Love

Not seeing what you need? No problem! Jump over to Pinterest and type in something you love, (like coffee) and add in “free coloring printable” and you’ll have a plethora of options to choose from! You can even try to create your own coloring pages with apps like ReallyColor.com! Don’t forget to Follow us on Pinterest for other mindful tips and tricks! 

 

Mindful Minute: Ninja Breath

Mindful Minute: Ninja Breath

Taking just a few minutes to focus on quiet breathing techniques can transform your classroom from chaos to calm. Ninja Breath is a fun and interactive way to explore the centering nature of intentional breathing. Check out our quick video below! Be sure to share this with your students and kids. Let us know how your little ninjas enjoyed the practice by tagging us on your social media!

Looking for more classroom calm? We’ve got all the resources you need with our MBAwareness program, which is designed to help students and educators utilize various mindful practices in and out of the classroom. You can meet your Social-Emotional Learning standards and have fun doing it! Click here to learn more about the MBAwareness program!

Take Your Practice into the World: Communication Tips

Take Your Practice into the World: Communication Tips

If your world is anything like mine, you’ve been spending a lot of time in Zoom meetings, phone meetings, and reaching out to friends and relatives via Facetime over the past few months. Instead of making a meaningful connection with the person on the other end, we sometimes leave one of these online encounters frustrated, empty, confused, and exhausted. Body language, tone, and expression can be hard to gauge and responses can sometimes be hard to navigate when we don’t share physical space. Developing effective listening and communication skills are more important than ever before. 

Making a true connection with others requires us to take our mindfulness or meditation practices off of the cushion and into the world. We have to use those same skills that we practiced with ourselves and apply them in our communications and relationships with others. Your work might be teaching in a classroom, managing your own company, making products in a factory, or caring for people in a hospital and the skills learned through the mindfulness practice will apply. This is why I love the tips that our Founder and CEO, Annamarie Fernyak, put together for you. At Mind Body Align, we do our best to live out our mission and core values every day and we hold each other accountable to them. Our successes have been achieved by putting these tips to work and sharing mindful communication as a team- creating a safe space for us to live and work. As someone who continually strives to learn more and to communicate better with my team and my family, I hope you will find them just as valuable as I did and will put them to practice in your work and life. 

– Jen Blue, Operations Director, Mind Body Align

 

Download the Mindful Communication infographic here.

 

 

 

Our Responsibility to Teach Essential Skills in the Classroom

Our Responsibility to Teach Essential Skills in the Classroom

It takes a community to raise our children! While volunteering to teach mindfulness in our local middle school, I noticed it was a struggle to get the children to focus, and there seemed to be discipline challenges. I sensed desperation in both teachers and students, which was shocking and disheartening.

At that time, being in the classroom was not foreign to me, but more often, I was found in the community trying to build stronger bonds around businesses and visitors within our downtown. After this day in the classroom, I realized it’s not enough for me to spur beautification and revitalization. It is not enough for our city leaders to attract innovative companies. A strong and vital community needs a strong educational system. We must provide the tools to create positive learning environments and to allow teachers to teach effectively. This leads to raising future generations of emotionally intelligent, wholehearted people.  We must intentionally grow adults who were taught the skills needed to build positive relationships, to focus and be aware, be resilient, and have discernment of values in order to know where to invest energy and time.  And so, the MBAwareness program was born.  We started with baby steps. 

For younger children, a mindfulness lesson may start like this:

Imagine you are a bear hibernating for the winter. When bears hibernate, they take long slow deep breaths in and out through their noses. Take a long breath in through your nose, and let it all the way out. Take another long breath in through your nose. Let it all the way out. Keep breathing like this and feel how relaxed and warm and safe you are in your cozy bear cave. (*get a FREE audio recording of this breathing exercise here!)

Imagine how calm children would be if this were how teachers routinely lead the first minute of class in your school. In a world that’s increasingly fast-paced, where kids are bombarded with media and screens, where they have less and less downtime to just be, these practices can teach kids essential skills. Like, how to calm themselves. How to focus and pay attention. How to manage their behavior and emotions. And how to practice compassion and kindness. They can also help kids cope with and release anxiety and stress. 

Mindful Schools looked at 400 elementary school students in four areas of classroom behavior: paying attention, participation, self-control, and respect for others. The kids did a simple mindfulness program three times a week for five weeks. After completion, they found significant gains in all four of those areas.  Let’s think about this for a minute. Improvements in self-control and respect for others are a total gift for teachers everywhere. They are also critical skills kids need to learn just to get along in life.  Paying attention in class and participation directly leads to academic gains. 

That’s what we are doing at Mind Body Align. We are starting with baby steps, but they are powerful baby steps. 

 

 

Interested in learning more about integrating mindfulness into your classroom?

Mindful education for teachers

We’ve got the perfect opportunity for you to learn the basics of mindful education and how to implement into your social and emotional learning objectives. This workshop is offered both in-person and online.

Click here to check- it out now! 

 

 

 

 

Perfectionism, Rewired.

Perfectionism, Rewired.

In my quest to write a perfect blog, while procrastinating with a slight fear of failing before I even get started, I will review with you a couple of ways to look at perfectionism. And perhaps through exploring those with you, I can help you and me identify some things we can both do to address that BIGG or little piece in each of us that may tend to be a perfectionist.  

The first definition of PERFECTIONIST I looked up is a person who refuses any standard short of perfection. Other definitions linked it to a personality trait or type that strives for flawlessness and setting up high standards, accompanied by being overly critical of themselves and others. There is a connection between perfectionism and a fear of failure, and a need to be accepted.    

I believe one can have high standards without some of the other things that go along with being a perfectionist. Once you have the emotional intelligence to recognize that you have some of the traits or qualities of being a perfectionist, you can work on addressing them for your own good, and the good of people around you, if you choose.  

Many of you know that as a trainer and coach, I am a huge advocate of Gallup’s strengths-based leadership research.  I love the idea that we need to focus on what’s right with people, rather than what is going wrong. This helps me manage perfection.  In looking over Gallup’s 34 top leadership strengths’ “basements,” I found one that has “perfectionism,” and that is the strength called MAXIMIZER. Things like “never good enough” and “always reworking” and “picky” are part of the basement that can happen when you overuse it.  It’s a strength I have that can make me a good coach. One that focuses on mastery, success, excellence, and working with the best. One that couples with my value that everyone can do their best, and everyone’s best can be different and EVERY kind and brand of excellence can be valued and rewarded. I believe people are perfect, not imperfect, just as they are.    

As a coach, how I manage to keep from falling in the basement of “perfectionism” is that I believe in people and think they know how to solve their issues and move forward in their lives. Sometimes it just takes someone believing in them to help them do it. It’s not my job to tell them what they need to do, nor fix them. I honor and applaud their excellence.  

Brene Brown, a well-known research professor, social worker, and five-time #1 New York Times best selling author, would suggest that PERFECTIONISM is a function of shame. Her definition is that perfectionism is a self-destructive belief system that fuels this primary thought – that if I look perfect or do everything perfectly, I avoid or minimize the painful feeling of blame, judgment, and shame.  

It’s destructive because PERFECTION is an unattainable goal.  

It’s getting sucked into proving I could do something versus PAUSING and stepping back and asking if I should do this, or if I want to do this. 

 

I LOVE PAUSING.  

Since my mother’s passing, I have worked a lot on emotional courage – to lean into and feel and identify the emotions I am experiencing, not judge them, but to sit with them and understand them, and explore if other choices could better serve me at some point. What’s the emotion that is behind this feeling of perfection? Am I feeling blame, judgment, or shame? What can I choose to do with it? How can I have a conversation with those I work with or someone who has dropped the ball without blaming, but just to talk about what happened so we can fix it and move on?

 

MOVE ON. LET IT GO.

How can we wade into our discomfort and vulnerability and tell the truth about our own stories, those real stories, those that we are not making up?  Some of the other things that we can do that Brene and I and others may recommend addressing those areas of perfection that don’t serve us include:  

*Say NO, not with an excuse, not with an explanation, just say NO. Set boundaries.

*Talk to ourselves like we would with someone we love. You are human. I am human. We all make mistakes. 

As a leader, I would recommend that you HAVE to make mistakes and be vulnerable in front of other people, especially those you supervise so that they know that they can make mistakes too.  

 

REACH OUT

  • Connect with someone who can respond with empathy and talk to them. Brene Brown suggests that shame cannot survive being spoken. Speak.  
  • Ask for help. Ask for your supervisor to help you prioritize. Quit picking up more work to do because no one else is. Hold people accountable. Give clear and honest feedback to them promptly.   
  • Catch people doing things right- celebrate victories and little or big WINS. Focus on gratitude. THANK people more.  
  • Ask for FEEDBACK from others…and don’t get defensive when you get it. Listen to it. Act on it.  

And my favorite:

  • Be a BADASS and don’t care what people think. Start “settling” a little bit more. Clarifying expectations is important, but you may need to lower expectations and standards …just because you can…and your expectations are not always reasonable or worth it.  

According to Brene Brown, Perfection is the furthest thing from badassery.